Corn

CORN  about 2 0z per pack

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Painted Mountain   If you’re looking for a pretty “Indian” corn to display or grind into cornmeal that is also early, this is the one for you!  Even with our wet, short, cool summer, we harvested lots of mature Painted Mountain and enjoyed husking cobs to discover simply gorgeous color combinations! It averages 8-12 rows of multi-colored flint kernels on 7-8″ cobs.  85 days to dry, mature corn.

 

Bear Island Chippewa ancient corn from Northern Minnesota.

Bear Island Chippewa  This very old, extremely rare Native flint, flour corn from Northern Minnesota is simply wonderful!  It is colored much like Painted Mountain but runs a bit more to the gold, bronzes and reds.  Also, the cobs and kernels are larger.  8-10 rows of large, fat kernels.  It makes very good cornmeal with a sweet flavor.  Best of all, it’s early and hardy.  80 days to mature, dry corn.

 

 

Burro Mountain Anasazi Popcorn

Burro Mountain Anasazi Popcorn   We were gifted a cob of this very ancient popcorn two years ago.  Last year our cow ate our planting!  Luckily, I still had over half a cob left so this year I again planted it (with a better fence in place!).  Despite a horrid growing year, it did very well, producing at least one nice cob and sometimes three cobs on each six foot plant.  The kernels are white and pointed as are many very old corns.  And it does pop, although much smaller “pops” than modern popcorn.  But the flavor is sweet and nutty. You can also grind this corn for cornmeal.  We love growing history in our garden and I think you will too!  1 ounce per pack as the kernels are small.  95 days to mature

Dakota Black Popcorn

Dakota Black Popcorn  Here’s a great heritage corn which is not only beautiful in fall displays and decorations but it tastes nutty as popcorn or ground into cornmeal.  Shining, pointed black kernels fill these five inch cobs to the tip.  This is a very productive corn and I think you’ll love it. 95 days to mature 1 oz per pack as the seeds are small

 

 

Glass Gem

Glass Gem popcorn  We read the raves of this gorgeous Cherokee-bred corn on the internet and in Farm Show Magazine and decided to try it.  WOW.  The plants are 9′-10′ tall and stool out with six or so tillers so you end up with a jungle of a plant.  And most tillers produce ears too.  We harvested an average of four ears per plant of 5″-6″ cobs of tiny-seeded corn.  But wait!  That corn comes in such a variety of colors you seldom see in “Indian” corn; pink, lavender, purple, mauve.  And the kernels are glistening colors like little pearls.  Very nice.  And you can pop it.  (No the typically white fluff of the popcorn isn’t colored in Glass Gem; just the hulls.) Or you can grind it into cornmeal if you wish. One ounce per pack  (as the seeds are small)  100-110 days.

 

 

IMG_9794Seneca Round Nose

Seneca Round Nose  We really like this old, Native corn from the Seneca tribe.  The cobs are big and fat with 8-10 rows of large kernels of white corn, sometimes tinged with red like you smeared lipstick over them.  The plants are very well rooted, tall and sturdy.  It’s good for roasting ears if you pick it in the milk stage but like other old-timey corns it does quickly get tough so be on your toes.  This corn can also be used for cornmeal.  9″ ears  90 days.

 

img_0777 Seneca Sunrise

Seneca Sunrise  This is a sweet corn developed by Will after years of breeding.  It is sweet, has fat 81/2″ cobs with 14-16 (or more) rows.  A great mid-season corn that will even dry down in the field here in Northern Minnesota.  This dry corn not only makes great seed for next year but grinds very nicely for nutty, sweet cornmeal.  As there is absolutely no corn grown within miles of us, you can be sure it has not been contaminated by GMO corn pollen blowing in the wind.  67 days

 

 

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Yukon Supreme

Yukon Supreme  If you need an early corn, this is the one for you!  It came in about five days before Seneca Sunrise although it was not as sweet and flavorful in our opinions.  But it did make nice six inch cobs, two or more per stalk full of nice yellow, corn flavored sweet kernels.  There is some variation as it is not quite stabilized and a few cobs will have bi-colored kernels.  But as far as we know, it’s the earliest corn out there worth eating.  62 days or less.  2 oz packet